Sep 04-09

Past-E-Mail: Cam Notes - 2009: September: Sep 04-09
Windigo    ...scroll down to share comments
Photos by William Pekuri
Hiking    ...scroll down to share comments
Photos by William Pekuri
Playing    ...scroll down to share comments
Photos by William Pekuri
Viewing    ...scroll down to share comments
Photos by William Pekuri


By
Mary Drew at Pasty Central (Mdrew) on Friday, September 4, 2009 - 05:15 am:

Over on the western end of Isle Royale, you'll find Windigo, which is a starting point for many a backpacker, including William Pekuri and the rest of these hearty hikers. From what I could gather from the photos in William's gallery album, they weren't just taking a hike, they were actually Geocaching over there, thus the photo of Jerod with his GPS in front of the Windigo sign. Then we get a feel of being on the hike with a shot from the back of the line, along with some of the antics of fellow hikers while taking a break. William named that third photo, "Some boys never grow up."

And finally, so you can see a bit of what they were enjoying while hiking, the "Wetlands" photo has been included. That pretty much embodies what Isle Royale is all about.... beautiful, peaceful, and enjoyable wilderness experiences.


By Brooke (Lovethekeweenaw) on Friday, September 4, 2009 - 08:33 am:

Someday I will make it to Isle Royale. Looks like they had fun.


By Dr. Nat (Drnat) on Friday, September 4, 2009 - 11:32 am:

Windigo is also a part of Indian legend. A Windigo is a beast that stalks wanderers of the Northwoods. It is said to be a tall, thin very strong creature that can run exceptionally fast. People who survive a Windigo attack get Windigo fever and can turn into a Windigo. To kill one you must burn its heart of ice.

There is actually a scientific basis in the Windigo legends. There is a condition known as Windigo psychosis that appears to affect some people after they have been isolated and starving for a period of time.


By kay Moore (Mskatie) on Friday, September 4, 2009 - 11:48 am:

Thanks Dr Nat. Always wondered about the meaning behind Windigo legend.I personally like the word windigo, some words are just cool sounding hey? This word is a beatiful teal-colored word to me, my favorite color along with purple. Call me crazy!


By Michael D. Peterson (M_peterson) on Friday, September 4, 2009 - 02:12 pm:

In Algonquian mythology
The Wendigo is part of the traditional belief systems of various Algonquian-speaking tribes in the northern United States and Canada, most notably the Ojibwa/Saulteaux, the Cree, and the Innu/Naskapi/Montagnais.[4] Though descriptions varied somewhat, common to all these cultures was the conception of Wendigos as malevolent, cannibalistic, supernatural beings (manitous) of great spiritual power.[5] They were strongly associated with the Winter, the North, and coldness, as well as with famine and starvation.[6] Basil Johnston, an Ojibwa teacher and scholar from Ontario, gives one description of how Wendigos were viewed:[7]

“ The Weendigo was gaunt to the point of emaciation, its desiccated skin pulled tautly over its bones. With its bones pushing out against its skin, its complexion the ash gray of death, and its eyes pushed back deep into their sockets, the Weendigo looked like a gaunt skeleton recently disinterred from the grave. What lips it had were tattered and bloody [....] Unclean and suffering from suppurations of the flesh, the Weendigo gave off a strange and eerie odor of decay and decomposition, of death and corruption. ”

At the same time, Wendigos were embodiments of gluttony, greed, and excess; never satisfied after killing and consuming one person, they were constantly searching for new victims. In some traditions, humans who became overpowered by greed could turn into Wendigos; the Wendigo myth thus served as a method of encouraging cooperation and moderation.[8]

Among the Ojibwa, Eastern Cree, Westmain Swampy Cree, and Innu/Naskapi/Montagnais, Wendigos were said to be giants, many times larger than human beings (a characteristic absent from the Wendigo myth in the other Algonquian cultures).[9] Whenever a Wendigo ate another person, it would grow larger, in proportion to the meal it had just eaten, so that it could never be full.[10] Wendigos were therefore simultaneously constantly gorging themselves and emaciated from starvation.


By Thomas Baird (Thomas) on Friday, September 4, 2009 - 03:08 pm:

Never been 2 Isle Royale, but it's certainly scenic, as these pictures attest 2.


By Richard J. (Dick_fl) on Saturday, September 5, 2009 - 09:46 am:

For those of you who might be interested here is a site about the Windigo: http://dinojoe.8m.com/crypto/windigo.html


By John Spellman (Briansmith12) on Monday, January 14, 2019 - 11:47 am:

Hello


By John Spellman (Briansmith12) on Monday, January 14, 2019 - 02:40 pm:

Reconsideration of documentary evidence indicates
that the Subarctic Algonquian windigo complex was
of probable prehistoric inception, that a
correlative psychiatric disorder entailing
cannibalistic ideation and behavior is
historically demonstrable, and that existing
ecological explanations of the complex fail to
elucidate its origin, persistence,
characteristics, and distribution. Examination of
the windigo complex from structural, pragmatic,
and ideological perspectives suggests that
instances of the psychiatric disorder were
conditioned by Algonquian theories of dreaming
and predestination
https://www.abogadosdeaccidentesflorida.com


By John Spellman (Briansmith12) on Monday, January 14, 2019 - 02:43 pm:

What is a Windigo? It is something like a
werewolf on steroids. It stands more than six
metres tall in its bare feet, looks like a
walking corpse and smells like rotting meat. It
has long, stringy hair and a heart of ice.
Sometimes a Windigo breathes fire. It can talk,
but mostly it hisses and howls. Windigos can fly
on the winds of a blizzard or walk across water
without sinking. They are stronger than a grizzly
bear and run faster than any human being, which
is bad news because human flesh happens to be a
Windigo’s favourite food. A Windigo’s appetite is
insatiable. Indeed, the more it eats, the
hungrier it get.
www.abogadosdeaccidentesflorida.co
m


By John Spellman (Briansmith12) on Monday, January 14, 2019 - 02:44 pm:


Notary Public UK


By John Spellman (Briansmith12) on Monday, January 14, 2019 - 02:45 pm:

The worst thing of all is that a Windigo was once a
human being. There are several ways someone can
turn into a Windigo. You might be cursed by a
shaman, or bitten by another Windigo.

Abogados de accidentes


By John Spellman (Briansmith12) on Monday, January 14, 2019 - 02:46 pm:

The most common cause, however, is to be starved
over a long period of time. If starved long enough,
some people turn into Windigos to survive. If a
Windigo reverts to its human form, it often becomes
overcome with remorse and begs to be killed before
it turns Windigo again.

Skip hire


By John Spellman (Briansmith12) on Monday, January 14, 2019 - 02:47 pm:

All right, before you run out and buy 100 metres
of electrified barbed wire to fortify your house,
please note that the Windigo is an Algonquian
legend. The Algonquian is the largest Aboriginal
language group in Canada, and includes the
Abenaki, Algonkin, Blackfoot, Cree, Mik’maq and
Ojibwa. Not surprisingly then, there are hundreds
of stories and even at least 45 recorded
variations of the word Windigo. Just a few
versions of the name are Atchen, Chenoo, Kewok,
Wheetigo, Windikouk, Wi’ntsigo, Wi’tigo, and
Wittikka.

Taxi


By John Spellman (Briansmith12) on Monday, January 14, 2019 - 02:49 pm:

The origin of the Windigo legend fades far back
into the prehistory oral tradition of the
Algonquian. The first known written account of
this legendary creature was by Paul Le Jeune, a
Jesuit missionary serving in Quebec in the early
17th century. In 1636, Father Paul sent a
dispatch to his superiors in Rome complaining
about a local native woman who, in a spiritual
trance, warned that an Atchen was coming to
attack a nearby village. The priest informed his
superiors that an Atchen was “a sort of
werewolf.”


Double Glazing Windows


By John Spellman (Briansmith12) on Monday, January 14, 2019 - 02:52 pm:

Virtually every human society has a horror of
cannibals. Being condemned to eat human flesh was
considered a punishment by God in the Old
Testament. Deuteronomy 28:53 is one particularly
chilling example: “Even the most gentle and
sensitive man among you will have no compassion
on his own brother or the wife he loves or his
surviving children, and he will not give to one
of them any of the flesh of his children that he
is eating.” Romans who could happily watch
thousands of helpless people being devoured by
wild animals in the arena would seek out and kill
unarmed Christians because their Pagan emperors
accused them of cannibalism. Virtually every
indigenous people European explorers came in
contact with was charged with cannibalism as an
excuse to “civilize” them.

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By John Spellman (Briansmith12) on Monday, January 14, 2019 - 02:52 pm:

Virtually every human society has a horror of
cannibals. Being condemned to eat human flesh was
considered a punishment by God in the Old
Testament. Deuteronomy 28:53 is one particularly
chilling example: “Even the most gentle and
sensitive man among you will have no compassion
on his own brother or the wife he loves or his
surviving children, and he will not give to one
of them any of the flesh of his children that he
is eating.” Romans who could happily watch
thousands of helpless people being devoured by
wild animals in the arena would seek out and kill
unarmed Christians because their Pagan emperors
accused them of cannibalism. Virtually every
indigenous people European explorers came in
contact with was charged with cannibalism as an
excuse to “civilize” them.

Party booth hire in Scotland


By meliodas (Meliodas) on Thursday, March 14, 2019 - 03:31 am:

So how could I go. When you are my destination,
pls.
geometry
dash


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