Aug 25-15

Past-E-Mail: Cam Notes - 2015: August: Aug 25-15
Quincy Swap    ...scroll down to share comments
Photos by Paul & Nathalie Brandes
Agate guys    ...scroll down to share comments
Photos by Paul & Nathalie Brandes
Bin of agates    ...scroll down to share comments
Photos by Paul & Nathalie Brandes
Copper Ingots    ...scroll down to share comments
Photos by Paul & Nathalie Brandes
UW Copper    ...scroll down to share comments
Photos by Paul & Nathalie Brandes
Antique lamps    ...scroll down to share comments
Photos by Paul & Nathalie Brandes


By
Mary Drew at Pasty Central (Mdrew) on Tuesday, August 25, 2015 - 10:31 pm:

What do Geologists do on vacation you might ask? Well, I don't know about all Geologists, but Capt. Paul and Dr. Nat (Paul and Nathalie Brandes enjoy exploring the shores of Lake Superior and checking out local rock swaps. In today's photos they visited the Quincy Mine Mineral Swap, which was held during the week long mineral festivities put on by Michigan Tech. Paul said for the first time in a few years, the weather was absolutely perfect for the event. He adds a description of the photos as follows:

Quincy Swap: Looking across the parking lot at the vendors that attended.

Agate Guys: These are the same guys that were at Ishpeming selling their agates; as you can see, they are a popular stop!

Bin Of Agates: One of the many bins of beautiful agates for purchase from the “Agate Guys” booth.
Copper Ingots: To me, the most interesting items at the Swap that night!!! These are some of the famous copper ingots that were recovered from the steamer S.S. Pewabic which sank in Thunder Bay off Alpena in calm seas on August 9, 1865. The inscriptions on the ingots, which weigh about 12 lbs. each, signify the mining company #Pewabic (PW#/Franklin #F#/Hancock #H# Mining Company #MC#) and shipped by Lake Superior Transit Company #LS and the T of the anchor).

UW Copper: Some specimens of native copper crystals that were recovered from the bottom of Lake Superior along a copper vein that extends out from the Peninsula. Divers recover these from the bottom not too far from where the 17 ton copper boulder was found.

Antique Lamps: A vendor selling some very nice antique mining lamps used by miners as well as blasting cap tins and what looked to be flasks.
I think I found the Copper Ingots the most interesting, along with the Antique Lamps, which are pretty neat to see those actual mining artifacts from back in the day. And of course the agates! Those are always amazing to see the beauty in just a few simple rocks.
By
mickill mouse (Ram4) on Tuesday, August 25, 2015 - 11:35 pm:

very interesting


By Thomas Baird (Thomas) on Wednesday, August 26, 2015 - 04:27 am:

The copper ingots are colorful.


By Alex "UP-Goldwinger" (Alex) on Wednesday, August 26, 2015 - 07:53 am:

UW...University of Wisconsin?


By Capt. Paul (Eclogite) on Wednesday, August 26, 2015 - 09:04 am:

Another surprise late in the evening! Thanks Mary for once again featuring some of our photos from a most wonderful trip to the Copper Country.


By Deb S. (Usedtobeayooper) on Wednesday, August 26, 2015 - 09:24 am:

I love the bin of agates! But then I've always
been a sucker for agates. Nice pictures Paul &
Nat!!


By Just me (Jaby) on Wednesday, August 26, 2015 - 10:42 am:

What fun pics! I should have attended just to look.


By Shirley Waggoner (Shirlohio) on Wednesday, August 26, 2015 - 10:54 am:

I knew when I saw this was about mining and 'rocks', it had to be the Capt. and the Dr.;) Nice display. I like agates too. Thanks to both of you, and Mary, for sharing this.


By Allen W. Philley (Allen) on Wednesday, August 26, 2015 - 11:39 am:

I have one of the Miner's Lamps. Grampa found it when he came UP to see me, just born while dad was at The Michigan College of Mining and Technology. The ingots are always interesting though it is hard for me to imagine any that were not remelted for final product.


By Duane P. (Islandman43) on Wednesday, August 26, 2015 - 02:35 pm:

Looks like there were a lot of rock hounds attending. I love those agates. I am pretty good at spotting them when they are cut in half and polished. Otherwise I am stone blind.


By Shirley Waggoner (Shirlohio) on Wednesday, August 26, 2015 - 03:27 pm:

Read (internet) that agate industry workers in India and China have higher incidences of respiratory diseases such as silicosis and turberculosis. Have to wonder why that is.


By Allen W. Philley (Allen) on Thursday, August 27, 2015 - 08:29 am:

Shirley, they may be cutting and polishing these without proper breathing protection and ventilation.


By Shirley Waggoner (Shirlohio) on Thursday, August 27, 2015 - 07:34 pm:

Yeah, that would make sense, wouldn't Allen. Thanks.


By Shirley Waggoner (Shirlohio) on Thursday, August 27, 2015 - 07:36 pm:

oops, left out my 'it' after wouldn't.:-/


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